'Historic' labour law raises fear workers will pay price
Cochin Herald|September - October 2020
The parliament passed historic labour laws that the Union government says help workers and business alike, but activists fear a loss of labour rights in a push for profits.

Experts said the laws - aimed at protecting workers and streamlining labyrinthine regulation - exempt tens of thousands of smaller firms, and rob workers of a right to strike or receive benefits.

Almost 90 percent of the country's workers operate in the informal sector with no security, low pay and little or no benefits.

The new laws, in the works for years, carry measures to meet the new challenge of COVID19, which has seen millions lose jobs under lockdown and forced many to walk thousands of miles home where they struggled to find work.

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