Two Afghanistans, One Diplomat's Seat
Bloomberg Businessweek|November 08, 2021
The Taliban want the UN to recognize their ambassador. The old ambassador isn’t budging
Amanda Kolson Hurley

The Taliban returned to power in Afghanistan almost three months ago, and senior United Nations officials and Western leaders are in regular contact with the Islamic militant group. So are foreign aid organizations, which coordinate with the Taliban on everything from food deliveries to medical assistance as it works to keep Afghanistan from collapsing.

But on the matter of international recognition, world powers aren’t quite there yet.

At a meeting this month, a UN committee that includes China, Russia, and the U.S. is widely expected to punt on rival requests for diplomatic representation—one from the UN ambassador of the deposed Afghan government and another from the Taliban. A deferral would allow Ghulam Isaczai, who represents the ousted government of President Ashraf Ghani, to continue to act as Afghanistan’s ambassador in New York, even though his government back home is long gone. Meanwhile, Suhail Shaheeen, the Taliban diplomat nominated for the position in September, will likely have to wait his turn indefinitely.

Getting him accredited isn’t the Taliban’s most pressing matter right now. About 19 million people, or half of Afghanistan’s population, face acute food insecurity, according to the UN. Rampant unemployment and a shortage of cash are putting urban residents—including the middle class—in danger of slipping into hardship as winter arrives.

Continue reading your story on the app

Continue reading your story in the magazine

MORE STORIES FROM BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEKView All

The Fed's Mind Control

The idea that monetary policy shapes inflation expectations is about to get road-tested

5 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022

Sheltered Paradise

With spectacular beaches, top-tier resorts, and a stellar Covid record, Anguilla is growing even more irresistible.

6 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022

Same City - Different Games

What’s changed since Beijing last held the Olympics? Almost everything

4 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022

Keeping Covid Out of The Cabin

As the pandemic enters Year 3, airlines are stepping up their hygiene routines

4 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022

Boxed In on China

Biden’s inability to extract concessions from Beijing is a liability going into November’s midterms

5 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022

Revisit Your Retirement Strategy

High valuations, rising interest rates, and spiking inflation make it time for a checkup

6 mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022

Ponzi schemer On the Pacific

Gina Champion-Cain was a beloved friend, mentor, and pillar of the San Diego business community. But her successful image and lavish lifestyle were fueled by a $400 million fraud

10+ mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022

How Did Blake Hall Get Between You And Your Identity?

During the pandemic his online-authentication company, ID.me, became the government’s digital gatekeeper. And its grip is only getting tighter

10+ mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022

Biden's Year 2 Test

As the pandemic wears on and prices rise, many Americans are disillusioned with the president. Can he win them back?

10+ mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022

A FIGHT OVER DISCRIMINATION IN THE AGE OF ALGORITHMS

Redfin has staked its reputation on making a racist industry more equitable. Critics say it’s been denying services to Black homebuyers and sellers

10+ mins read
Bloomberg Businessweek
January 24, 2022
RELATED STORIES

THE ROCK ROLLS OVER VIN – AGAIN!

Vin’s been pressuring The Rock to do another “Fast & Furious”

1 min read
National Enquirer
January 24, 2022

Eyes on Irises

There's more to this floral family than can be seen in the backyard.

1 min read
Birds & Blooms
February/March 2022

RUSSIAN COURT SLAPS GOOGLE, META WITH MASSIVE FINES

A Moscow court slapped Google with a nearly $100 million fine and also fined Facebook’s parent company Meta $27 million over their failure to delete content banned by local law, as Russia seeks to step up pressure on technology giants.

1 min read
Techlife News
08, January 2022

CHINA URGES US TO PROTECT ITS SPACE STATION FROM SATELLITES

China is calling on the United States to protect a Chinese space station and its three-member crew after Beijing complained that satellites launched by Elon Musk’s SpaceX nearly struck the station.

1 min read
AppleMagazine
AppleMagazine #532

IS A CURE FOR BLINDNESS REALLY A MIRACLE?

MOST PEOPLE WHO SEE FEEL LOST AND HELPLESS WHEN EVERYTHING IS DARK.

4 mins read
Muse Science Magazine for Kids
January 2022

EMPOWERING YOUNG PEOPLE

JEREMY GILLEY is a British director and actor who founded the non-profit organization Peace One Day in 1999. Jeremy’s creativity was sparked early in life, and he has spent over twenty years passionately committed to peace, sustainability, equality, justice, diversity, inclusion, climate action, and the mobilization of youth. He is the producer and director of four annual global digital experiences – Anti-Racism Live, Climate Action Live, Peace Day Live, and Space Transformers Live, an experience for young changemakers. With his signature enthusiasm and humor, in part 2 of this interview, he shares his vision for enabling young people with JUDITH NELSON of the Heartfulness Institute.

7 mins read
Heartfulness eMagazine
January 2022

GOOD BUGS

THESE CREATIVE CRITTERS OFFER HELP TO HUMANS IN A VARIETY OF WAYS.

8 mins read
American Outdoor Guide
February 2022

PLENTY OF PITFALLS AWAIT ZUCKERBERG'S ‘METAVERSE' PLAN

When Mark Zuckerberg announced ambitious plans to build the “metaverse” — a virtual reality construct intended to supplant the internet, merge virtual life with real-life and create endless new playgrounds for everyone — he promised that “you’re going to able to do almost anything you can imagine.”

5 mins read
Techlife News
01, January 2022

WHAT PROGRESSIVES GET WRONG ABOUT JUDICIAL REVIEW

IN FEBRUARY 1958, a distinguished liberal jurist named Learned Hand told a distinguished liberal audience some-thing that it did not want to hear. The U.S. Supreme Court’s celebrated power of judicial review, Hand declared in a lecture at Harvard Law School, was fundamentally illegitimate.

10 mins read
Reason magazine
February 2022

An Elder Army to Care for Kids

With universal pre-K high on the agenda in the U.S., staffing shortages loom. Here’s a solution

3 mins read
Newsweek
January 07 - 14, 2022