The MVP Of Super Bowl Ad Sales
ADWEEK|January 28, 2019

CBS president and chief advertising revenue officer Jo Ann Ross has overseen six Big Games, and has the dramatic stories to prove it.

Jason Lynch

The New England Patriots’ Bill Belichick will be heading into his ninth Super Bowl on Sun-day, tops among all NFL head coaches. And among current TV ad sales chiefs, his counterpart is CBS’ Jo Ann Ross, who has headed up network ad sales for CBS since 2002. For Ross, now president and chief advertising revenue officer, this is the sixth Super Bowl she is overseeing, more than all of her peers combined.

As she put the finishing touches on this year’s sales, Ross looked back on the most memorable moments of her six Super Bowls, from the other big controversy during the Janet Jackson halftime show to the year she secretly battled cancer to her showdown with the brand that decided to sit out the game for the first time in 23 years.

Super Bowl XXXVIII (2004)

THE OTHER HALFTIME SHOW CONTROVERSY

New England Patriots 32, Carolina Panthers 29

Average price per 30-second spot: $2.3 million

(All data from Kantar Media except where noted.)

Heading into her first big game as head of ad sales, “all eyes were on us, because it was the first Super Bowl under new sales management,” says Ross, who wasn’t daunted by the assignment. After all, “I oversaw the [Winter] Olympics”—which used to air on CBS—“and that’s like 18 days. And I have a great sales team.”

Her inaugural sales process was fairly smooth, but then things went awry at the game in Houston during that year’s halftime show, which became infamous following Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” as she performed with Justin Timberlake. But for Ross, the anxiety actually started a few minutes earlier, when Kid Rock, who had performed along with Diddy, Nelly, Jackson and Timberlake, unexpectedly inserted the words “Coors Light” into the lyrics of his song “Cowboy.” That angered Anheuser-Busch, which was the game’s exclusive alcohol sponsor.

“The client is in the suite, listening with headphones to the feed, going, ‘He said Coors!’” recalls Ross, who hastily got on the phone with the production truck trying to determine what had happened when the real halftime show controversy unfolded. “I had my back to it, and one of my execs walks in and she goes, ‘Holy shit, did you see what just happened? Janet Jackson just showed her nipple!’ And I’m like, ‘What did you just say?’”

In the ensuing pandemonium, Ross found herself escorting a livid Roger Goodell (who at that time was NflCOO, before becoming commissioner in 2006) to then-CBS CEO Leslie Moonves’ suite. As Moonves and Goodell sorted out what had transpired (CBS pointed the finger at MTV, which had produced the halftime show), Ross spotted Tony Ponturo, then vp of global media and sports marketing for Anheuser-Busch, who had been watching the game in Moonves’ suite.

“I came over and kissed him and he goes, ‘I wanted to talk to you about the Kid Rock thing—but I think you have bigger fish to fry. We’ll have breakfast tomorrow morning,’” says Ross, who kept talking with him after the game on the way to the Survivor after-party. Eventually, “He said, ‘Jo Ann, don’t worry about it. We don’t have to have breakfast; we’ll figure it out.’ He was being like, ‘I know what your life is right now,’” says Ross, who never had to make it up to him. “And that’s because of the relationship we have with A-B.”

After Ross smoothed things over with Ponturo, “I remember walking into the Survivor party and none of the clients were talking about the game,” even though a record 37 points were scored in the fourth quarter, she says. “Everybody was talking about Janet Jackson and her breast.”

Super Bowl XLI (2007)

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