ON THE ROX!
Motoring World|December 2021
Yamaha makes a fun machine that finally puts the 'scoot' in 'scooter'!
Kartik Ware

I expected a lot of things from the Yamaha Aerox. But I certainly didn't expect to watch the owners of a mint RD 350 and a Ténéré 700 simultaneously lose their heads over it. And they headed straight to a Yamaha dealership right after to book one each, too. That's a tuning-forked seal of approval right there! In fact, I haven't met anyone yet who doesn't want an Aerox for themselves. That includes yours truly, and I'm not a scooter guy, not even by a long shot. And I don't mind if the Aerox turns me into a part-time modern Mod by finding a space in my garage — because it's fun!

To be honest, I never really got the 'convenience' bit that scooters are applauded for, and I pretty much wrote down any preference for knee-knockers to either an aversion to fun and/or a predilection for laziness. Add to this the wobbly nature of small-wheeled machines, and CVTs that drain tiny fuel tanks like alcoholics at Oktoberfest, and my apathy towards scooters may make some sense. However, the Aerox showed me that all I was missing from scooters was performance and something to hold with my legs essentially, it's a scooter that's a bit more like a motorcycle. And it certainly looks the part.

The Aerox is nothing if not a scooterised version of Yamaha sports bikes, and it looks as sharp as a shark's mouth. Every inch of the Aerox's surface screams bloody sporty murder. I like the aggressive front, the bike-like rear, the Venom-eyes headlamps, the svelte tail-lamp, the satin-finish wheels wrapped in fat rubber, all of it. I also like the X-shaped element on its flanks which leads to the fuel tank between the rider's legs, and the fact that the Aerox blocks a lot of light in that area when viewed in profile. Fans of floorboard acreage, please look away. I could go on about the Aerox's looks, but I'll sum it up in one sentence — it's right at home even in the MotoGP paddock where I once saw Valentino Rossi ride one himself.

The Aerox is also built to typical Yamaha standards so it's as solid as it is stylish. The only sore sight, at least for me, were the twin shock absorbers that somehow look like afterthoughts. On top of that, they don't even feature basic preload adjustment which is a problem that I'll come to later. And while I'm listing my complaints, I might as well add the absence of a twin-piston calliper at the front and the lack of a pass switch. Also, a number of presumably dyslexic observers saw the Aerox's decals and exclaimed 'xerox!' They were mighty pleased with themselves, too, after generating such high-quality amusement. But none of this mattered when the Aerox was on the move.

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