Agriculture
Partners Left The Corporate World To Pursue A Successful Agricultural Social Enterprise Image Credit: Agriculture
Partners Left The Corporate World To Pursue A Successful Agricultural Social Enterprise Image Credit: Agriculture

Partners Left The Corporate World To Pursue A Successful Agricultural Social Enterprise

FARM-TO-FOLK is a social enterprise that aims to educate and empower local farmers. Adrienne Tan, and her partner, Carl Lee, the people behind Farm-to-Folk, believe that the Philippines has a really good potential for agricultural growth, and they want farmers to know that.

Nikky Necessario

Tan is a vegetarian, the principle in which her advocacy rooted. She hopes to provide affordable healthy alternatives to the modern Filipino diet, which can be quite unhealthy. She firmly believes that “what we feed our bodies becomes us.” Tan also said the love for food that she and her partner share helped in establishing their business. It was after a surfing session in Quezon that they saw a farmland near the beach, which sparked their interest to invest in farming, even if both of them did not have backgrounds in agriculture. Raised in Mindanao, Tan was exposed to farming communities. She had ideas about the grassroot problems of farmers, which they try to help resolve in Farm-to-Folk.

Both Tan and Lee took a risk and quit their corporate jobs to pursue a livelihood in agriculture. Their educational background in Industrial Engineering helped them in managing and strategizing the business and its logistics. Tan admitted that it wasn’t easy, especially because they had to learn everything from scratch. They spent about two months researching. It was in August 2018 when they finally launched Farm-toFolk with the help of their family and friends.

Farm-to-Folk has four different product lines which consist of grains, fruit and vegetable powders, coconut, and cacao. They get their cacao mostly from farms in Visayas and Mindanao regions. Their grains are mostly grown in Luzon. They also reach out to farmers in Kalinga, where they cultivate red rice, particularly Ulikan, where it is endemic to the area. At first, most of the farmers that grow produce for Farm-to-Folk didn’t know that their lands had potential. Tan and Lee scouted barre


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