Switch to previous version of Magzter

Try GOLD

Are You Eating Too Clean?
Turns out there is such a thing as eating too clean. Here’s what you need to know about this latest eating disorder — and why you might want to dirty up your diet a bit.
Matthew Kadey, MS, RD

These days, a food is either classified as good or bad: Vegetables and fruit are righteous and “clean,” while cookies, ice cream and french fries are sinful, guilty pleasures. But in an era of hyper-focused diets — keto, Paleo, vegan, Mediterranean — these lines are getting blurred. Depending on who you ask, certain fruits and veggies have too much sugar, butter is a superfood, milk is a toxin and wheat — even the whole-grain variety — causes a belly pooch and flagging energy.

An unintended consequence of this food shaming is that, for some people, the quest to clean up their diets goes way overboard and they head down a path toward disordered eating. Maybe your initial goal was to kick your sugar habit, but you are now obsessed with reading labels and completely avoid anything sweet. Or perhaps a well-intentioned goal to banish processed foods now manifests as an irrational fear of anything sold in a package. Regardless of how you arrived there, you might be eating too clean — and are ironically now putting your health at risk.

A NEW NERVOSA

While healthy eating is important for your overall health and fitness gains, it is not uncommon to take it too far. “Orthorexia nervosa occurs when someone goes overboard in their quest for healthful eating to the point where it becomes pathological,” says Thom Dunn, Ph.D., professor of psychological sciences at the University of Northern Colorado.

He explains that an individual with orthorexia genuinely believes that they are working toward healthy eating by restricting and avoiding certain foods in the hopes of sidestepping various diseases or diet-related symptoms and end up creating overly stringent and rigid rules based on their perception of what clean eating should be. Individuals with orthorexia also may use their diet to achieve a feeling of perfection, purity or superiority. “They can be preachy about eating and may feel judgmental toward those who don’t follow their narrow definition of a healthful diet,” Dunn adds.

Continue Reading with Magzter GOLD

GoldLogo

Get unlimited access to thousands of curated premium stories and 5,000+ magazines

READ THE ENTIRE ISSUE

September - October 2019

MORE STORIES FROM OXYGENView All
7 Simple Moves To Improve Alignment And Boost Confidence
Oxygen
3 mins read
The 12-Minute Total-Body Tabata
Oxygen
3 mins read
Attention Female Athletes: It's Time To Consider Another Kind Of Iron
Oxygen
2 mins read
Body Fat - The Good, The Bad And The Beige
Oxygen
4 mins read
How To Prevent And Resolve 5 Hand Issues For Athletes
Oxygen
3 mins read
New Approach To Nutrition For Better Health, More Energy And Improved Results
Oxygen
5 mins read
Eat, Drink & Still Shrink
Oxygen
3 mins read
4 Deadlift Variations To Bring Your Backside Back To Life
Oxygen
6 mins read
The 60 Day Metabolıc Reset
Oxygen
7 mins read
Are You Eating Too Clean?
Oxygen
5 mins read
RELATED STORIES
Have Your Cake And Eat It Too!
Muscular Development
9 mins read
Holiday Favorites In 5 Holiday Menus
Delight Gluten Free
10+ mins read
How 'Food As Medicine' Doctrine Hurts More Than It Helps!
VOGUE India
5 mins read
Do You Really Need This? Wellness Shots
Men's Journal
1 min read
Simple Recipes For Every Day – And For Special Days
Arthritis Today
2 mins read
Be Your Best Yet! Start Fresh In 2020
Arthritis Today
10+ mins read
4 Ways To Break An Unhealthy Cycle
Natural Solutions
2 mins read
How To Make Sex Even Better
Men's Health Singapore
5 mins read
Keeping You On Top Of Medical News
National Enquirer
2 mins read
What To Do If Your Horse Won't Eat
Equus
10+ mins read