MARSH IS MISJUDGED AND MISUNDERSTOOD
The Cricket Paper|September 20, 2020
MARSH IS MISJUDGED AND MISUNDERSTOOD
As live sport ground to a halt during the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic, bored cricket fans desperately craved content and, fortunately, several heroes stepped up in the time of need.
Tristan Lavalette

Most notably, Rob Moody, the cricket obsessive who uploads a glut of match footage on his YouTube channel, became much more than a cult Twitter handle to emerge as a global phenomenon.

Amazon Prime, too, seized the moment and released ‘The Test’ – the documentary into Australian cricket’s journey from the nadir of the sandpaper scandal to retaining the Ashes in 2019.

The addictive eight-part docuseries was a revealing insight into the Australian team and the extensive candid footage shone a light onto the players behind the helmets and pads.

Co-produced by Cricket Australia, it was a golden opportunity to continue the team’s rebrand away from the bravado and machoism that defined Australian cricket before the humiliation of Newlands.

One of the breakout stars of the docuseries is Mitchell Marsh, the much-maligned all-rounder who believes “most of Australia hate me”. Even the biggest sceptic would have enjoyed Marsh’s scene stealing role in ‘The Test’, where his innate exuberance was exemplified by a penchant for air guitar and his unmistakable humility underlined by organising coffee runs.

It’s the type of character those around him know only too well. It’s why his teammates spoke so glowingly about Marsh. Ask those who have played with him and they all essentially say the same things: He’s the ultimate team man; the type of reassuring presence every locker room needs.

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September 20, 2020