THIS IS MY M4 PT7: THE FAT FINGER SHUFFLE

Airsoft Action|July 2020

THIS IS MY M4 PT7: THE FAT FINGER SHUFFLE
AFTER YEARS OF MAKING MINOR MODIFICATIONS TO RIFS WITH VARYING DEGREES OF SUCCESS, STEVE GOES ALL-IN ON HIS MWS TO FIND OUT JUST WHAT AN INEPT HOME TECH CAN ACHIEVE. THIS MONTH: TRIGGER GUARD, CHARGING HANDLE AND MAG SKINS.

As regular readers will know, we’ve enjoyed a cracked lower receiver during the course of this build. But without time or tools to properly address that issue and the original cause - for now, at least - it’s time to look at an ergonomic oversight for me personally; the flat trigger guard.

If you wear full-fingered gloves for airsoft - and who could blame you after the first time you take a 350FPS shot to a digit - then you’ll know that space is at a premium for index fingers in standard trigger guards.

It may be authentic and there’s certainly nothing wrong with TM’s flat guard as such but it’s not exactly welcoming of fat-fingered friends such as myself. So as part of the journey to tailor the M4A1 to my individual needs, I fitted the MAP-style trigger guard by Angry Gun. There are many other options on the market but I chucked it in the basket as I was placing an order for other, bigger items as covered in previous issues.

GINGER SPICE

A trigger guard isn’t a hard part to fit but I was understandably more ginger in the way I approached it, having already caused damage to the lower receiver.

The standard trigger guard is secured in two places. To the front is a moveable pin that you simply press in to clear the receiver as it swings down. To the rear is a pin that requires you to tap clear of the body - preferably from the nearside. You mean I have to take a hammer to it again? After the trouble, I got into last time? Okay, deep breath…

Even using a rubber mallet, that’s more stress through the damaged body than I’d like, but even though the pin resisted, it came free in the end. Be advised though; it’s a length of rolled metal rather than a solid pin, so I wouldn’t recommend abusing it with pliers or similar in case it gets bent out of shape, which would make it difficult - or impossible - to reseat.

“BUT NO DICE. INSTEAD, I NEEDED TO REMOVE THE SCREW ENTIRELY, LINE UP THE MOUNTING HOLES, INSERT THE SCREW AND TIGHTEN FROM OUTSIDE. NO DRAMA, BUT SOME INSTRUCTIONS WOULD HAVE BEEN NICE!”

PRESS FOR ACTION

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July 2020