‘GRIPEN-E DESIGN ENABLES IAF TO MAKE CHANGES IN TACTICAL FUNCTIONS IN A VERY SHORT PERIOD OF TIME'
Geopolitics|October 2020
‘GRIPEN-E DESIGN ENABLES IAF TO MAKE CHANGES IN TACTICAL FUNCTIONS IN A VERY SHORT PERIOD OF TIME'
Saab’s plans for technology transfer programme is more of a capability transfer, going well beyond just the mechanics of transferring technology, including supporting current and future indigenous fighter programmes, explains OLA RIGNELL, Chairman and Managing Director, Saab India, in this interview with GEOPOLITICS

How does Saab aim to take advantage of India's recent 'Atmanirbhar' policy, which aims to enhance India's indigenous defence manufacturing base?

India’s quest for self-reliance is critically dependent on technological know-how and know what. The challenge is to build domestic capability without foregoing cutting-edge systems. The process requires Indian industry to leapfrog technologies and start designing, developing and producing state-of-the-art systems in the immediate future. In addition, such programmes should have significant spillover of technology to non-defence sectors. India needs companies to not only bring but also develop technology in India, thereby creating an eco-system. Sweden, and Saab, have a proven track record of being open to sharing critical technology and working closely with partner countries to build such capability. We call it true transfer of technology. This includes training, transfer of know-how, capability development, and development of a strong supply chain for cutting-edge technology systems.

What is the status of Saab's offer for the IAF 114 fighter programme and what are the next steps?

We have responded to the RFI with Gripen E which is the latest and most advanced multi-role fighter aircraft to the IAF. Gripen E design enables IAF to make changes in tactical functions in a very short period of time as compared to current methods. Saab has provided a comprehensive ‘Make in India’ offer for long term job creation with substantial production, maintenance and development capability. Our plans for technology transfer programme is more of a capability transfer, going well beyond just the mechanics of transferring technology, including supporting current and future indigenous fighter programmes, for example AMCA.

All of these would be provided at a competitive cost, covering the entire lifecycle of the aircraft and the systems.

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October 2020