From Here to Eternity
Oklahoma Today|November/December 2020
From Here to Eternity
AT THE STATE’S NORTHWESTERNMOST TIP, TIME STANDS STILL, CIVILIZATION AND ITS ATTENDANT POLLUTIONS ARE SPARSE, AND QUIET CONTEMPLATION IS RIGHT AT HAND.
Nathan Gunter

SPIRITUALLY SPEAKING, IT makes sense that the tip of the Panhandle is the location of the state’s highest point. Here, closer to heaven than anywhere else in Oklahoma, time doesn’t apply the way it does elsewhere—and not because Kenton, the tiny town at the base of the mesa, is the only community in the state to operate on Mountain Time. Among the weather sculpted rock outcrops and scrubby landscapes, the signs of eternity are everywhere. In the visible layers of soil and rock lie the remains of animals and plants from millions of years ago. Near the 4.2-mile trail leading to the state’s highest point, visitors can turn off the road to find fossilized dinosaur tracks in a dry riverbed. At Black Mesa State Park, a display of petrified wood is a perfect selfie spot. By night, the stars are visible like they are in few other places, giving skywatchers a mind-bending glimpse of the vastness of the cosmos.

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November/December 2020