Bugle CALL

South African Garden and Home|February 2020

Bugle CALL
Leoné Williams of Petal Faire Nursery selects nine popular climbers with eye-catching, trumpet-shaped blooms
CONNALL OOSTERBROEK

You can never have too many climbers in your garden,” says plant specialistWeomeé Williams of Petal Faire’, Nursery in Pretoria. “But, remember * that while most are well behaved and will obediently fill up a trellis or neatly cover your pergola, there are some that, given the chance, will try and take over,” she warns. To get plentiful blooms over the longest period, Pd te them in good soil, water regularly, ital in spring with Talborne’s Vita Fruit’and Flower (3:1:5) and always keep a pair of Y secateurs at hand.

1 NEPAL TRUMPET FLOWER (BEAUMONTIA GRANDIFLORA)

This strong creeper has large, glossy leaves and magnificent, fragrant, 150mm-long, white flowers. It’s hardy to -3°C and can climb up to 10m high. “I adore this plant and mine is in flower practically throughout the year,” enthuses Leoné. “But do give it a strong support and some space to grow as the vines can get quite thick and heavy. Or use it as a cascading shrub against a wall,” she says.

2 PORT ST JOHNS CREEPER (PODRANEA ICASOLIANA)

Similar to the bower vine, this aptly named rambler hails from the Wild Coast and is an excellent choice for indigenous enthusiasts. Fast growing and easy to cultivate, it needs full sun and nutrient-rich, well-drained soil. Give it regular applications of well-rotted compost and plenty of water in summer. It can also be grown in large containers placed where the long stems can be trained up the pillars of a pergola.

3 BOWER VINE (PANDOREA JASMINOIDES)

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February 2020