FACTORY FINISH

Belle Magazine Australia|May 2020

FACTORY FINISH
Embracing the columns and stained-glass windows from an earlier time, a fresh makeover inserts a desired layer of sophistication and intimacy to this warehouse home.
CHRIS PEARSON

Embracing the columns and stained-glass windows from an earlier time, a fresh makeover inserts a desired layer of sophistication and intimacy to this warehouse home.

This page An Arflex ‘Botolo’ sheepskin chair from Poliform invites pause in the space near the kitchen looking through to stairs leading up to the first floor bedrooms. To create cosiness and intimacy, a hefty barn-style door can roll across to close off the area. Fredericia ‘Spine’ stools from Great Dane. Stoneware vessel by Katarina Wells from Curatorial+Co. V-groove panels by Benja Build. Opposite page Looking through the portico from the living room to the hallway. Sofa from BoConcept. Artisan ‘Neva’ dining chair from Spence & Lyda. Walls painted in Dulux ‘Vivid White’.

This page Around the ‘Locator’ dining table from Mark Tuckey are a mix of chairs from Spence & Lyda, including the Artisan ‘Neva’, Neri & Hu ‘Shaker’ and Nichetto Studio ‘Vivien’, all on a hand-knotted rug from The Rug Establishment. Oly ‘Klemm’ chandelier from Coco Republic. On table Ceramic vessel from Planet, glasses and plates from Montmartre Store and ‘Ariel’ sculpture by Carol Crawford from .M Contemporary. In the sitting area beyond stands a Manér Studio ‘Arc’ floor lamp from Great Dane. Untitled, 2019 artwork by Laura Ellenberger from .M Contemporary. Opposite page The library, which features abundant storage by Gumtree Joinery, can be divided off from the open plan with curtains should the owners desire. ‘Oslo’ lounge chairs and vintage over-dyed rug, both from Coco Republic. Ligne Roset ‘Belize’ mirror and ‘Daphna’ vase, both from Domo. Floors finished in Feast Watson ‘Black Japan’. In the hallway, ‘Lehnstuhl’ armchair by Nigel Coates for Gebrüder Thonet Vienna from Space. Maquette A, 2019 ceramic sculpture by Gidon Bing from .M Contemporary.

Like its central courtyard, which forms the lungs of this warehouse in Sydney’s inner west, an inspired renovation has been a breath of fresh air to a one-time trouser factory. It strides out with a new-found confidence, thanks to architect Josephine Hurley. The unassuming 1909 brick building, crouched in an alleyway, had been transformed into a home by an eager DIYer years before. Many of the quirky elements that today make it so special were already in place but, says Josephine, they were random and eclectic, and called for a more coherent vision.

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May 2020