THE INS AND OUTS OF APPLE'S STREAMING MUSIC SERVICE: APPLE MUSIC FAQ
Macworld|October 2020
THE INS AND OUTS OF APPLE'S STREAMING MUSIC SERVICE: APPLE MUSIC FAQ
WHAT KIND OF PLAYLISTS CAN I CREATE? WILL APPLE MUSIC REPLACE ITUNES? WE HAVE THE ANSWERS, AND MORE.
LEAH YAMSHON & MACWORLD STAFF

Apple singlehandedly turned the digital music marketplace on its head when it launched the iTunes Store in 2003 (go. macworld.com/is03). Since then, the iTunes Store has evolved into Apple Music (go.macworld.com/ evam), a music streaming service to compete with the likes of Spotify, Tidal, and other services.

Whether you’re new to Apple Music or have been a subscriber since day one, there’s a lot to take in—especially if you’re considering jumping ship from another service. Our guide to everything Apple Music can help set the record straight.

APPLE MUSIC: GETTING STARTED

What the heck is this thing? Apple Music combines subscription-based music streaming with global radio-like programming. It’s an all-you-can-eat service for subscribers: Pay a flat fee, and you unlock all of Apple Music’s extensive 60 million-song library.

The Music app, which is how you use the service, comes pre-installed on all new iPhones, iPads, iPod touches, and Macs. You can also access Apple Music on the web at music.apple.com (go.macworld.com/muap).

Isn’t Apple Music the same as the iTunes Store? Not at all. The iTunes Store is all about media ownership, functioning as both a virtual record store and an efficient digital library for music that you own personally. On the iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, you’ll find an iTunes Store app separate from the Music app.

On the Mac, the iTunes app went away; Apple released new Music, Podcasts, and TV apps. The iTunes Store is now a section of the Music app and you can still buy music there.

If the iTunes Store is about buying music, then what is Apple Music about? Apple Music is all about streaming. You pay a flat fee to unlock access to Apple Music’s entire catalogue, but you don’t actually own the music you listen to. The files don’t live individually on your devices; you’re instead just listening to tracks stored remotely, that are owned by Apple. If you subscribe to any other media streaming subscription service—be it a music-only service like Spotify or Tidal, a TV service like Hulu, or a movie/TV combo service like Netflix or HBO Now—Apple Music functions the same way.

Is iTunes dead? Not exactly. It has taken on new forms. You can access your entire iTunes library from within Apple Music— just tap the My Music tab (think of your iTunes library now as your music library). The iTunes Store still exists if you prefer to continue to buy music à la carte.

If you had TV shows and movies in iTunes, you will find them in the TV app.

What makes Apple Music different from Spotify/Tidal/every other music subscription service? Apple puts a lot of emphasis on Apple Music’s Beats 1 and its curated playlists.

Beats 1 (go.macworld.com/btrd) is its radio offering, which features an around-the-clock worldwide live broadcast from DJs based in Los Angeles, New York, and London. It delivers a curated selection of songs, pop culture news, and interviews with artists.

Speaking of curation, Apple Music also offers up recommendations tailored to your tastes, looking at artists you like and serving up other artists and playlists for you to listen to. But instead of being built by algorithms, they are built by real people, according to Apple. You can find these in the For You section of the app—but first you’ll have to set it up by following the prompts to select genres and artists you like.

Apple Music’s library has over 60 million songs. Oh, and you can also watch music videos without ads, and check out Apple’s exclusive original content.

Apple Music used to have an artist-based social networking feature called Connect. Artists were able to share special content with fans through Connect. For example, hip-hop artist Drake used the service to post behind-the-scenes photos of his life, share snippets of new songs, and other content. But Apple discontinued the Connect service (go.macworld.com/cnsv).

How much does this cost? Apple Music costs $9.99 per month, or $14.99 per month for a family subscription for up to six people (which requires iCloud Family Sharing [go.macworld.com/ifsh]). College students can subscribe for $4.99 per month.

articleRead

You can read up to 3 premium stories before you subscribe to Magzter GOLD

Log in, if you are already a subscriber

GoldLogo

Get unlimited access to thousands of curated premium stories, newspapers and 5,000+ magazines

READ THE ENTIRE ISSUE

October 2020