VIOLENCE IS NEVER OK

WHO|July 13, 2020

VIOLENCE IS NEVER OK
WHAT YOU CAN DO IF YOU BELIEVE A FRIEND IS EXPERIENCING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

On February 19, the death of Hannah Clarke and her three children at the hands of her estranged husband, Rowan Baxter, sent shockwaves across Australia. The much-loved mum, 31, died along with Aaliyah, 6, Laianah, 4, and Trey, 3, when Baxter doused them in petrol and set them alight in their car in Camp Hill, Queensland. Horrifyingly, Hannah’s case is not an uncommon one.

On average, one woman is killed every nine days by her current or former partner and one in three Australian women has experienced physical violence. It’s a scary statistic that never fails to horrify.

During the COVID-19 pandemic and isolation periods this year, the number of Google searches for domestic violence support services has surged, prompting the government to dedicate $150 million to support those suffering family and domestic violence at this difficult time.

But what if you’re not the one experiencing the abuse, but believe someone you love is in a harmful situation at home? Reaching out to help a friend or family member escape an abusive relationship can prove challenging, as you must offer your assistance and support while ensuring their safety isn’t compromised.

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July 13, 2020