Kiplinger's Personal Finance
Robotics Artificial Intelligence Calls Caller ID Image Credit: Kiplinger's Personal Finance
Robotics Artificial Intelligence Calls Caller ID Image Credit: Kiplinger's Personal Finance

Stop The Robos!

Technology has made those annoying recorded calls ubiquitous, and technology can help you fight back.

Your phone rings and a perky voice announces that she is “Heather from card services,” and she has important news for you. You know Heather is a recording and that the low interest rate she’s promoting is a scam. You hang up.

Robo calls that use sales pitches or scare tactics to siphon your money are on the rise. Unwanted calls have topped the Federal Communications Commission’s list of consumer complaints over the past several years. Many are against the law: Most robo calls to your smartphone are illegal, and robo sales calls to your home phone are illegal except in specific circumstances. And they are becoming trickier to spot. Robo callers are covering their tracks by “spoofing,” or falsifying their caller ID so it displays a fake number that appears to be local.

The FCC recently announced that phone companies may proactively block calls that appear to be spoofed—a good step forward, says Margot Saunders, senior counsel to the National Consumer Law Center.

What you can do. Start by checking to see if you inadvertently gave permission to some callers to disturb your dinner. For example, you may have checked a box on a loan application consenting to reminders by any means. You’ll need to contact the company to revoke your consent.

Adding your number to the Do Not Call registry (www.donotcall.gov) will deflect live sales calls from legitimate telemarketers. However, it won’


Read unlimited Articles & Magazines with Magzter GOLD
Try Magzter GOLD Now

More from Kiplinger's Personal Finance