The Curious Case Of Shared Economy And IR
The Curious Case Of Shared Economy And IR

The role of Technology would be beyond its deterministic capabilities, as its presence in human processes and interactions have huge implications on economics, culture, and politics.

Mrinmoy Majumder

Within the growing paradigm of shared/gig economy, we need to revisit Lynda Gratton's book, The Shift: The Future of Work is Already Here, where she articulates the future of workplaces, and traces possible changes that can frame the concept of work. One of the key forces would be that technology, apart from altering the landscape of workplaces, also has a key role in fuelling economic growth. Technology would redefine the previously held notion of work, influencing working lives in a much deeper form. The role of Technology would be beyond its deterministic capabilities, as the presence of technology in human processes and interactions have huge implications on economics, culture, and politics. In addition, the critical issue is that technological advancements do not locate technology in isolation, being rather a conjuncture of various concepts - economics, culture, and politics. Such arguments throw light on the imbalance that would follow technological advancements in workplaces, which in fact, are bound to be a product of the dynamic nature of economics, culture, and politics. Nevertheless, the position of technology at work would be evident and add different aspects to work. Though there has been an age old suspicion on the impact of technology on the workplace, its position at work would be evident. This will add different layers such as reduced demand for skilled and unskilled workers, the delayering of organisational hierarchy, owing to which very few managers and supervisors would be required.

The all-pervasive 'Cloud'

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March 2019