OCEAN PROOF HOW TO PREPARE FOR (NEARLY) ANYTHING
OCEAN PROOF HOW TO PREPARE FOR (NEARLY) ANYTHING
IN PART 2 OF THE SERIES, VICKY ELLIS LOOKS AT CHAFE, RIG PROBLEMS AND HOW TO KEEP YOUR CREW ON SIDE
VICKY ELLIS

In this series we examine some of the more likely incidents that occur on long bluewater ocean passages, not necessarily the headline catastrophes. Here I’m going to look at some of the issues that may occur with the rig, and how to keep your crew – your biggest asset – on side, happy and healthy.

CHAFE IS THE ENEMY

Losing your rig migt be foremost in your mind, but before we get on to that, let’s look at something you definitely will experience: chafe.

Chafe is one of the biggest gremlins for bluewater cruisers. Keeping chafe at bay, checking for it and protecting against it with careful design, clever ideas and some anti-chafe protection will get you through a voyage unscathed. Without this, it will eat its way through halyards, sheets, sprayhoods and more in a matter of days, if not hours.

Jerry Henwood (best known as ‘Jerry the Rigger’) explains that a halyard with a small amount of play will roll a tiny amount backwards and forwards on it’s turning blocks with every wave and, in the course of a typical Atlantic crossing, could therefore move the equivalent of 8km while loaded. Shifting your halyards a centimetre or two a couple of times a day will help move the wear point on sheaves and jammers and prolong life

If you can’t bear the sail trim that this trick produces, then take some lengths of the thin yet tough anti-chafe Dyneema sleeve. It can be secured over the top of your lines in areas of wear.

This rope chafe protection is especially good where guys go thorough pole beaks, for tack lines that may chafe on a swivel block, and reefing lines or halyards. If you can’t get hold of the specially designed anti-chafe sleeve, the outer sheath of old sheets can be placed over the top of ropes. Just ensure that the edges of the outer cover are well stitched and whipped on to prevent the sleeve coming loose and jamming the line.

Other tips for prolonging the life of your lines are to end-for-end them every so often or to buy them extra long and trim some off when it looks worn.

Other items I squirrel away before setting off are snatch blocks, big and small – and well-made. They’re an expensive collecting habit, but worth it.

Preventers that run back to the cockpit, poled-out jib sheets and downwind rigs all get in the way of something and having snatch blocks and a stash of soft shackles or Spectra strops can allow you to make an easy re-routing plan to avoid chafe in the middle of a valuable line.

Poled-out headsails are the bread and butter of bluewater downwind rigs. It’s a good idea to secure your pole independently of the headsail sheet using an uphaul/topper, downhaul/foreguy and guy/aft guy. Running the headsail sheet through a snatch block attached to the outer end of the pole reduces chafe in the beak and means you can furl the sail quickly if a squall crops up, without worrying about moving the pole. To avoid the clanging sound of a snatch block hitting your pole, add a wrap of thick leather or rope around the end of the pole to absorb the clangs.

Chafe also affects canvas and sails; it’ll not take long to wear a hole if a mainsheet is rubbing on a bimini or sprayhood. I do chafe checks after every new sail setup and on the whole boat twice a day at sea. I like to do a dawn and dusk check and get the rest of the crew involved, so that it’s not a case of one pair of eyes looking for the problem or knowing what to spot.

Meanwhile, UV will degrade canvas covers, sails and plastic fittings (especially plastic jackstay buckles), craze hatches and degrade vanish. Keep a look out for its effect, as frustrating failures can occur as a result.

RIG CHECKS

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April 2020