MAKE A REALISTIC KIMONO
3D World UK|June 2020
MAKE A REALISTIC KIMONO
Eugenia Peruzzo explains how to simulate clothes for game characters from a two-dimensional pattern to a ready-to-sculpt mesh
Eugenia Peruzzo

This tutorial is an in-depth, step-by-step guide of my personal approach to creating a kimono in Marvelous Designer, from making the sewing pattern to exporting the complete garment. In addition, there will be some tips on how to import and handle the final mesh in ZBrush. The techniques can be applied to any other type of clothing.

This workflow is tailored towards the end goal of making the garment usable for realtime character production. The type of kimono created is a fantasy version concepted by Radoslav Topalov, as real ones usually cover the ankles and knees completely.

Marvelous Designer differs from most 3D software because it requires a little knowledge on how to sew clothes, as the software was created originally for tailors and dressmakers. If you are new to this discipline, doing some research prior to attempting this tutorial will help you. It is also advised to at least have a basic knowledge of MD.

At the beginning of this tutorial you will need a base mesh in a suitable pose for simulating clothes on top of it (ideally A-pose) or you can use one of the avatars provided in the software. It is important to use a real-world size model to achieve realistic results, as otherwise the simulation won’t work correctly.

Before starting, spend some time studying your references. In this case, how kimono are constructed in the real world, and observe the physical behaviour of the fabrics, especially folds. Find all the suitable patterns you’ll need and put them together into an image. The garment in question has an additional level of difficulty because of the particular way it is folded. You should watch some tutorials online on how to put on a kimono or yukata to ensure you give proper homage to this spectacular type of garment.

01 RETRACE THE SEWING PATTERN

First bring your mesh into MD by importing the OBJ as an avatar and make sure that the bottom of its feet are on the floor. Create a rectangular shape in the 2D window with the Rectangle tool. Apply a fabric with the texture of your pattern added to it. Once you have your pattern start using the Internal Polygon/Line tool to retrace the pattern as illustrated in the picture. For curved lines use the Point/Split Line tool in combination with the Edit Curve and Edit Curve Point tool. Once finished right-click it and select Clone as Pattern.

02 REFINE SIZE AND SHAPE

Move the freshly made pattern in front of your avatar using the gizmo (3D Viewport) and make sure it is roughly the size you need. To divide the front from the back and allow proper simulation, use the Internal Polygon/Line tool again and press Shift to create a straight line. Once created, right-click and select Cut & Sew to split the pattern in two.

03 SEW AND MIRROR

Rotate around 180° the patterns that need to face the backside and position all the pieces as close as possible to the body mesh, making sure the normals are facing away from it. After the patterns are arranged in the 3D Viewport you can start sewing the pieces together using the Segment Sewing tool. Mind that the edges sewn together should always be almost the same length. Now select the patterns in the 2D window, right-click and mirror them with Symmetric Pattern (with Sewing) and sew the two backsides together.

04 SIMULATION AND FOLDS

Once ready, hit the spacebar and simulate! Pin the cloth on the shoulder with the Tack on Avatar tool. To create the folded front parts of the kimono, make two patterns with the Rectangle tool and split them in half with an internal line. To ensure the line is in the middle, use the Uniform Split Line box, which you can bring up while selecting a side and right-clicking Split Line.

05 FOLD STRENGTH AND ANGLE

Select the internal line of the folds and turn on Fold Rendering in the Property Editor on the right, with Fold Strength 100 and Fold Angle 0. After this, sew the patterns to itself. At this point, the pattern would just fall on the floor when simulating. A little trick to avoid this is to select the polygons on the top of the pattern in the 3D Viewport with the Pin (Box) tool before hitting the spacebar. If it looks correct, delete the pins, sew the patterns to the front and back of the main garment, like in the picture, and simulate again.

06 PIN, FOLD AND REFINE

At this stage you should have an open garment hanging from the shoulders. Use the Pin (Box), Tack and Tack on Avatar tools in the 3D Viewport to fold the left side of your kimono on top. For all the simulations up to this point ignore the details and concentrate on the large shapes. Really take your time with it and adjust the size and shape of your patterns to fit the body correctly.

07 ADD BELT AND OBI

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June 2020