Analog Science Fiction and Fact - March/April 2017

Publisher: Penny Publications, LLC
Category: Fiction
Language: English
Frequency : Bi-Monthly
DurationAmountSavings
Single issue $ 5.99 -
1 Year $ 35.99
-

Published since 1930, Analog Science Fiction and Fact is one of the most enduring and popular science fiction magazines of all time. Starting with its January/February 2017 issue, Analog Science Fiction and Fact updated its annual subscription format to feature a total of 6 issues per year, all of them 208-page double issues. The new format allows for expanded articles and more special features, as well as greater editorial flexibility overall, and comes with no increase in the annual subscription price! Analog’s editorial emphasis continues to be on realistic stories that reflect high standards of scientific accuracy and imagination, and on lively articles about current research at the frontiers of real science. A recurrent theme in both fiction and provocative opinion columns is the human impact of science and technology. Home to many bestselling authors, including Robert J. Sawyer, Michael F. Flynn, Stephen Baxter, Catherine Asaro, Harry Turtledove, Joe Haldeman, and Ben Bova, Analog has won numerous Nebula, Hugo, and other awards cementing its position as a leading SF periodical. Analog Science Fiction and Fact features 6 double issues each year.

Normally this is where I let you in on the content you can look forward to in the next issue, and I’m still going to do that, but I want to talk about something even bigger first: Effective immediately, with the very magazine you hold in your hands, Analog will be publishing only double issues—six of them per year. Right off the bat, you’ll see more novellas, longer book review columns, and more variety in the themes that thread through the stories. (For example, our next issue will have both the usual lighter April fare as well as a selection of time-travel pieces.) The main advantage is that this format allows us to hold current subscription prices a bit longer. (You may have already noticed that this issue is 208 pages instead of our customary 192 for double issues; we worked hard to make sure that there wouldn’t be any loss of content.) So, what kinds of things can you expect in this brave new world? Well, we have two novellas: “Nexus” by Michael F. Flynn, and John Alfred Taylor’s “Plaisir d’Amour”; “Sustainability Lab 101,” our fact article from Stanley Schmidt; and a trio of novelettes—“Europa’s Survivors” by Marianne J. Dyson; “Host” by Eneaz Brodski; and “The Human Way” by Tony Ballantyne—as well as almost a full “single” issue’s worth of short stories, some light-hearted, like “Ecuador vs. the Bug-Eyed Monsters” by Jay Werkheiser, and “Concerning the Devastation Wrought by the Nefarious Gray Comma and Its Ilk,” by Tim McDaniel; and some that involve a relative rarity in these pages: time travel. “Eli’s Coming,” by Catherine Wells; “Grandmaster” by Jay O’Connell; “Alexander’s Theory of Special Relativity” by Shane Halbach; “Time Heals” by James C. Glass; and “The Snatchers” by Edward P. McDermott—all struck a chord with me (for different reasons), and I bet at least some of them will for you, too.


Recent Issues

View All

Related Magazines

View All