Reptiles Magazine - Nov/Dec 2020Add to Favorites

Get Reptiles Magazine along with 5,000+ other magazines & newspapers

Try FREE for 7 days

bookLatest and past issues of 5,000+ magazines & newspapersphoneDigital Access. Cancel Anytime.familyShare with 4 family members.

1 Year$99.99

bookLatest and past issues of 5,000+ magazines & newspapersphoneDigital Access. Cancel Anytime.familyShare with 4 family members.
(Or)

Get Reptiles Magazine

1 Year $21.99

Save 27%
book6 issues starting from Nov/Dec 2020 phoneDigital Access. Cancel Anytime.

Buy this issue $4.99

bookNov/Dec 2020 issue phoneDigital Access.

Gift Reptiles Magazine

  • Magazine Details
  • In this issue

Magazine Description

In this issue

Would you be able to recognize if your reptiles were suffering from stress by their behaviour? This is something that researchers at the University of Lincoln in the UK have been investigating, and their research is really interesting. The team focused on bearded dragons and red-footed tortoises. An animal’s response to an unfamiliar environment is a commonly used as a method in mammals and birds to determine their welfare. Yet before the Lincoln team could adopt this approach, they needed to know how reptiles respond to an unfamiliar environment, and if those individuals taking part would show a marked behavioral variation in response to familiar versus unfamiliar environments. So the reptiles were initially familiarized with one of two environments, and their behavior recorded. After this, they were moved to the second, unfamiliar environment, and their behavioral responses in the two contrasting environments were compared. Their behavior was analyzed using pre-existing indicators, derived from mammalian and avian behavior, such as displaying a willingness to move and the time spent moving around the enclosures. Specific indicators for each type of reptile, such as tongue-flicking and tongue surface contact for the bearded dragons, plus neck extension for the tortoises were also used. The investigation found that the stress-induced behavior caused by an unfamiliar environment is a valuable welfare indicator for the red-footed tortoise. These reptiles displayed hesitation when starting to move in the unfamiliar environment, as well as reduced neck extension. Interestingly, however, the longer that a tortoise spent in either environment, the further the neck was extended, suggesting that relaxation occurred over time regardless of where the tortoise was being housed.

  • cancel anytimeCancel Anytime [ No Commitments ]
  • digital onlyDigital Only