COOK MAGAZINE - June 2017

Publisher: COOK MAGAZINE
Category: Cooking, Lifestyle
Language: English
Frequency : Monthly
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Being the oldest monthly culinary magazine in the Philippines, Cook Magazine continues to evolve and adapt to the interests and demands of our readers and supporters. We at Cook Magazine pride ourselves with providing our readers and advertisers practical, kitchen-tested recipes from our country’s top chefs and food experts, local and international dining destinations and food-related features and event partnerships. We look forward to leading the way in sharing our love of food for years to come.

I am writing my Editor’s Note while vacationing here in England. Our regular visits to this beautiful country give our little family a chance to bond, an opportunity to enjoy the sights, the food and the company of friends and each other. Little things like taking out the trash, fixing our beds, folding clothes and teaming up in the kitchen for our daily meals are mundane activities that I treasure—which I hope he’ll appreciate and remember with fondness when he’s all grown up. I write this Editor’s Note just after reading the late Pulitzer Prize-winning Alex Tizon’s article on modern day slavery for The Atlantic. It’s a tale about Lola, their family’s “slave” for 56 years. Lola worked for Alex’s grandfather, then for his mother, was brought to America when their family migrated, and retired while still helping out at Alex’s home. Lola died while preparing dinner at the Tizon household. 56 years, serving three generations. The word slave used for Lola wasn’t an exaggeration, she was for years unpaid, given to the family as a gift. Only when she started working for Alex did she get to “retire”, and ironically, was the only time she started getting a salary. I am sharing this because as normal as having helpers is in the Philippines, as well as we may treat the help, as much as we love them like family, the reality is that it will always be an unequal relationship. Some may justify having helpers as providing jobs to those in need, but if we’re really being honest, it is taking advantage of someone for our convenience. My son asked me the other day why people had no maids here in England. I explained that only the very rich can afford help here because the law demands that they be paid like any other working person. I said it is not the same back home, to which he replied: “…then hindi pala fair sa Pilipinas.” I hope someday, there won’t be any ates anymore. I hope in the future, all be equal. When that day comes and I am still alive, I hope everything is automated.


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