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GRUMPY OLD EDITORIAL If someone suddenly gave me unlimited wealth and I could spend the rest of my life doing exactly what I wanted, I would build a glass-walled, barn-sized extension to my house, fill it with small trees and large ferns and a mezzanine floor which would become my office. From my new office, I would continue to produce Tasmania 40°South magazine, because for a grumpy old newspaper hack like me, there is nothing more perfect to do in the gentler years of life than to produce a glossy, non-political, non-opinionated journal about the todays and yesterdays of this paradisical corner of Earth. There are moments, however, when it is less than paradisical, such as when Australia Post announces that the cost of posting Tasmania 40°South to its subscribers will rise an estimated 10 per cent, and take three days longer, for mass mail out, and rise a staggering 41 per cent for regular mail. It is less than paradisical to have to announce a 10 per cent increase in our cover price as a consequence. You can save some money by becoming an early-bird subscriber, and you can save even more money by switching to a digital subscription right here at www.magzter.com. In the meantime, on behalf of Australia Post, we apologise. Back in paradise, we have major Tasmanian history features this issue from James Dryburgh and Bert Spinks, we have a thorough and fascinating epicurean look at the development of cool climate shiraz in Tasmania and elsewhere by George W. Russell, and we have some seriously compelling whimsies by Chris Armstrong, communing with a series of keen, wet walkers on Mount Anne, by Chris Wilson, communing with ghosts deep in the West Coast wilds, and by Don Defenderfer, communing with nature generally.

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